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Meet the new wave of Icelandic artists set to play at Airwaves 2022

30 October 2022, 09:30

As Iceland Airwaves returns after a three-year absence, we meet the homegrown artists making their first appearance on the stages of the much loved Reykjavík music festival this coming week.

As blue skies turn to gray and the sun’s warmth slowly fades away, a gentle tingle courses through Reykjavík’s audiophiles.

The first frost has already arrived and to onlookers the northern capital might look sombre, but the musically oriented know it signals the coming of Iceland Airwaves, their heretofore annual music festival.

Airwaves is held for the first time since the Covid-19 pandemic started on 3–5 November, and it sees renowned international acts share the stage with a showcase of Iceland’s sonically diverse talent. 85 acts play at eight venues over the three-day festival, in addition to numerous off-venue offerings, which is a breath of fresh air from the past two years’ broadcast shows with limited audiences.

Part of the festival’s appeal is its mission to continually remain fresh, inviting fresh artists to liven up the offering. Below, we meet fifteen of the Airwaves virgin–acts, performing for the first time at the festival.

Árný Margrét

This young artist has been no stranger to success. At 21 years of age, Árný has already signed onto One Little Independent Records, has performed at the Newport Folk Festival, and released the enthusiastically received debut album They Only Talk About The Weather early this month. Hailing from the remote and musically-enriched Westfjord town of Ísafjörður, we’re looking forward to seeing her cast her gentle guitar-plucking spell on attendants.

Where in Iceland are you from?

I’m from Ísafjordur in the Westfjords of Iceland.

When did you start making music?

I think I was around 16 or 17.

Describe your sound

It’s mostly just my voice and the guitar, sometimes I throw something else in there, but it’s raw music. Maybe a blend of folk and indie, but I can’t really pinpoint it.

What got you through Covid?

Doing music actually, a lot of things happened during covid. I met my producer, got signed to a record label and recorded my EP and album, which is so crazy, cause I never would have imagined that.

Why should we come see you at Airwaves?

It will be different from last time and also from all the other shows I’ve ever done. I’ll have two other musicians playing with me this time. Which will be the first time for me playing with a band live.

Who else should we check out?

Júníus Meyvant, I’ve been a big fan of him and his music for a long time.

Where should we go during the day to nurse our Airwaves hangover?

I’m not too familiar with the city myself but maybe go to a bakery, get a warm drink, go for a walk, maybe find a cool record store, there are a lot of cool places around.

FLOTT

Groovy quintet FLOTT (“cool”) has been making the rounds in Iceland, releasing seven singles since their formation in 2020, one of which “Mér er drull” (“I don’t give a shit”) won best pop song in Iceland’s 2022 music awards (FLOTT also won the audience award as the hottest newcomers). The band was formed by stand up comedian Vigdís Hafliðadóttir out of a genuine desire to be in a girl band that performed poppy songs about boys and feelings. Teaming up with friend Ragnhildur Veigarsdóttir, they picked the other band members to fit that vision and have been delivering witty hit after hit since then.

Where in Iceland are you from?

Reykjavík

When did you start making music?

We started writing together in January of 2020

Describe your sound

Our sound has been described as alt-pop/funk which we find cool. The music is thought to have a nice vibe, catchy yet original melodies, and witty and descriptive lyrics that often tell a story.

What got you through Covid?

We had just started making music when covid hit. We were bummed that we couldn’t start performing since we already had some songs done by then, but we used the time to cultivate our sound even more before releasing our first single in November of 2020.

Why should we come see you at Airwaves?

You should come see us because we bring good vibes! However we won’t be offended if you want to go somewhere else.

Who else should we check out?

We recommend checking out our friends Ceasetone, Countess Malaise, Gugusar, Inspector Spacetime, Supersport!, BSÍ, Superserious and Una Torfa if you can!

Where should we go during the day to nurse our Airwaves hangover?

The best way to start the day would be to have a nice brunch (we highly recommend Coocoo’s Nest!) and then hit up one of the local swimming pools. Sit in the jacuzzi until you start pruning. After the pool you should get some ice cream.

gugusar

gugusar is the nom du plume of 18-years-old Guðlaug Sóley Höskuldsdóttir who proved to be a surprise hit when she appeared on the scene. Catchy and dreamy, she took part in the 2019 Músíktilraunir, Iceland’s battle of the bands competition, and was selected as the best electronic act. Since then she’s released crowd-funded debut album Listen To This Twice in 2020, was given the audience award for hottest newcomer at Iceland’s music awards in 2021, and now seems primed to deliver her biggest show yet at Airwaves.

Where in Iceland are you from?

I was born and raised in Reykjavík.

When did you start making music?

I started producing music when I was about 13 years old.

Describe your sound

I make electronic pop mostly but I´m also making rap, hiphop, drum’n’bass songs at the moment.

What got you through Covid?

Having more time to spend in the studio was pretty nice. Music got me through Covid.

Why should we come see you at Airwaves?

Performing is my favorite thing to do ever. I love dancing and getting the crowd to dance with me but I'm mostly just excited to have a great time and hopefully the people will as well.

Who else should we check out?

My dad's favorite band is Amyl and the sniffers, I think he is more excited to see them than me to be honest. I´m also very excited to see them. It would also be amazing to see Metronomy.

Where should we go during the day to nurse our Airwaves hangover?

Unfortunately, I´m only 18 years old. I'm probably not the best person to ask this question, but I do love the bagel place Deig and taking walks in downtown Reykjavík.

Inspector Spacetime

The inspector trio was assembled in Iceland’s first lockdown when their studies all became remote and they had nothing but time on their hands, as well as access to a studio. Surfing on a cloud of warm and danceable energy, all songs on their debut eponymous album are technically redos, as the original album was deleted by accident. Thankfully, the second go was a smashing success and Inspector Spacetime has enjoyed well-deserved enthusiasm ever since.

Where in Iceland are you from?

We’re all from the capital region. Egill and Elías grew up in Kópavogur and Vaka is from Reykjavík.

When did you start making music?

We started in march 2020 when the first lockdown started.

Describe your sound

We make poppy dance music inspired by all kinds of different genres like french house, hyperpop and disco.

What got you through Covid?

We really just used the lockdown to meet up and make music. We suddenly had all the time in the world so we wrote all the songs from our first album in just a few weeks.

Why should we come see you at Airwaves?

We have a very energetic live show and we make it our mission to get everybody dancing.

Who else should we check out?

There are so many great bands playing, we are really excited about Go_A and we think Gróa is probably the best Icelandic live band out there. Here are some other great acts we like: gugusar, Sameheads, Unnsteinn, Ultraflex, BSÍ.

Where should we go during the day to nurse our Airwaves hangover?

Go to Deig and have a bagel and a donut, then go to a public swimming pool, then go to the Bíó Paradís cinema and have a beer while watching a movie. After that you can go to a concert and do it all over again.

JóiPé

One half of dynamic (and now on hiatus) hip-hop duo JóiPé x Króli, Jóhannes Damian Patreksson’s solo outing absolutely slaps. His debut album Fram í rauðan dauðann is evocative, filled with thumping beats and the clever wordplay and playful use of the language that the Icelandic rap scene is renowned for (but is unfortunately lost on international listeners). Don’t expect anything but a first class live performance, too.

Where in Iceland are you from?

I’m from a town called Garðabær.

When did you start making music?

I started writing my own music when I was 15 years old.

Describe your sound

I would say that my sound is quite raw and expressive. I like blending traditional hip-hop sounds with organic elements, the digital with the living. But my sound is structured and polished with help from my dear friend Hafsteinn Þráinsson.

What got you through Covid?

Hangouts with friends and lot’s of music making got me through Covid. However, I have to admit, the introvert in me might have quite enjoyed the social gathering restrictions.

Why should we come see you at Airwaves?

Well this my first time playing as a solo act and this will be the first time playing my new released album, Fram í rauðan dauðann. I am super excited to play with my amazing band and we promise one hell of a show.

Who else should we check out?

Wow there are so many great acts! I'm definitely going to check out Metronomy, I’m a huge fan. If you want to have some real fun I recommend checking out Inspector Spacetime as well.

Where should we go during the day to nurse our Airwaves hangover?

Go swimming! the hot tub is the way to cure my hangovers and then go get a trúðaís at the Ice cream shop. After that you should be good.

KUSK

The energetic 18-year-old Kolbrún Óskarsdóttir won this year’s Músíktilraunir, Iceland’s Battle of the bands, as KUSK. This electronic artist shines with gleeful enthusiasm while performing her glitchy pop, and has just released her first album, SKVALDUR, a week before Airwaves.

Where in Iceland are you from?

Originally I´m from North and East Iceland, but I´ve lived in Vesturbærinn, Reykjavík, for many years.

When did you start making music?

The whole thing kind of started when I opened Garageband on my computer in Covid, November 2020. I started producing, singing and writing songs. Then I met Hrannar, called Óviti, and things really started rolling. Now we have been making music together and performing for over a year now.

Describe your sound

Since I’ve made the majority of my songs in my bedroom I would definitely say bedroom pop. But I’m still developing the direction I want to go in music. I also work a lot with experimental and indie pop, and using live instruments along with electronical.

What got you through Covid?

I wish I could be less cheesy and all that but I really have to say music. Like I said before I started making music in quarantine because I had nothing else to do. I got really interested in producing and songwriting. My whole Covid experience contained a lot of music whether it was discovering new artists, making my own or going to concerts.

Why should we come see you at Airwaves?

I want to play fun music for fun people. So if you want to listen to fun music, and consider yourself a fun person, you should stop by:) I’m also releasing my first album, called SKVALDUR on October 28th. It will have loads of new songs that I haven’t played before and look forward to play at Airwaves.

Who else should we check out?

I would definitely recommend going to see Gugusar. She is and amazing producer and musician.

Where should we go during the day to nurse our Airwaves hangover?

Definitely KEX Hostel. They have the best pizzas and beers. There is nothing like taking a break from what you´re doing and going to KEX. We have basically become regulars at KEX in the last few months, they have the best vibes in town (we will not talk about how much we have spent on pizzas there). I also recommend checking out the art museums in town, they always have fun and interesting exhibitions.

Laufey

Lo-fi jazz enthusiasts should be no strangers to LA-based Reykjavík-born Laufey. A talented multi-instrumentalist, Laufey first played as a cello soloist with the Iceland Symphony Orchestra at age 15 before diving headfirst into her own take on modern jazz. She’s been one to watch for years, and now Airwaves-goers will finally get their chance.

Where in Iceland are you from?

Born and raised in Reykjavík!

When did you start making music?

I started playing piano and cello as a child - I grew up playing lots of classical music! I started writing and experimenting more with different styles of music in college which eventually led to recording and releasing my first song!

Describe your sound

Jazzy, Cinematic, timeless

What got you through Covid?

I started this music project during covid and I was so focused on making music and shaping my sound that the worst of covid flew by! It was music that got me through.

Why should we come see you at Airwaves?

Because I’m playing an acoustic solo set in an old church that my grandmother went to as a kid that’s located in the heart of Reykjavik! It’s going to be so special!

Who else should we check out?

Eydis Evensen and Magnus Johann are playing in the same venue as me and are both fantastic composers, musicians and friends!

Where should we go during the day to nurse our Airwaves hangover?

To either Vesturbæjarlaug or Sundhöllin swimming pools to sit in a hot tub and hang out in true Icelandic fashion. Then go to Brauð og Co afterwards and get a giant cinnamon bun. Follow up with a hot dog from Bæjarins bestu!

Ólafur Kram

In many ways, Ólafur Kram feels like a callback to the best of Iceland’s 80s experimental chamber pop–music that’s meant to be performed live in community centres in coastal towns, with enraptured inhabitants dancing and drinking well into the night. Under the surface, however, are intellectual references sewn into the lyrics and an uncanny ability to subvert expectations; no wonder they won last year’s Músiktilraunir.

Where in Iceland are you from?

We are all from the capital area. Sævar is from Hafnarfjörður, but the rest of the band is from Reykjavík. We know each other mostly through the Icelandic music scene and through Menntaskóli (upper secondary school).

When did you start making music?

Most of us have been making music in one way or another since we were little, but we came together as a band in 2018 around this time, right before Airwaves. A friend of ours was hosting a concert in loft hostel, so we banged up some songs and a cover – but it was off-off-off venue really. But after that, the ball started rolling. Sæsi joined in 2021, right before Músíktilraunir, and has been a part of the band since.

Describe your sound

We don’t always know how to describe it, but we know it when we hear it. Perhaps it can be described as a sort of tongue-in-cheek music. We allow ourselves the freedom to explore different styles, and try anything that comes up. On our new album, for example, is a baroque-rap-punk song, a dreamy-disco song and an emo-radiohead-Barbara Streisand song. So we have good variety!

What got you through Covid?

We had a hard time in the beginning, but as time progressed we competed in musíktilraunir, and after our victory and subsequent EP release started making new music. That got us through covid – that and listening to good music.

Why should we come see you at Airwaves?

We are amazing live performers! We have 4 lead singers, so it can get a bit chaotic at times, which we think just adds to the fun. We sing in Icelandic, so you can get a real Icelandic experience at our show. Our songs are quite unique and could be described as patchwork, so everybody can find something they like about our music!

Who else should we check out?

Skoffín, Supersport!, Axel Flóvent, BSÍ, Kusk, Gróa, Sucks to be you Nigel! All of these bands are amazing and have very good stage presence!

Where should we go during the day to nurse our Airwaves hangover?

We really like the sandwiches at Kaffibrennslan, and they have a really good atmosphere. Stúdentakjallarinn is also quite nice, they have very good burgers and fries, and there’s usually some movies or a football game on. Going to the swimming pools is probably also the best cure for a hangover that we know. Chilling in the hot tub and then having a steam! Beautiful!

RAKEL

The dreamy and emotive RAKEL has been in the music scene for a while, only stepping out of the shadows a couple of years ago to unveil her solo works. Gentle, dreamy, melodic, and deeply melancholic, she’ll be performing with a full band at Airwaves.

Where in Iceland are you from?

I’m from Akureyri, in the North part of the country. It’s the biggest city outside of the capital area, 19.000 people to be exact. A good place to grow up in, and lovely to visit as well.

When did you start making music?

I started playing the violin when I was 6 years old and have always been playing and singing, performing with other artists and such. It wasn’t until 2019 that I gathered the courage to start creating my own music, so pretty recent.

Describe your sound

I always feel like sounds a hard to describe with words. But let’s give it a go. As I mentioned, music writing for me is pretty new, so I feel like my sound is still evolving and developing. It now ranges from just me with the acoustic guitar to more electronic, bigger soundscapes. I guess what it all has in common is my voice and a kind of melancholy and sombreness that travels through it and into my songs.

What got you through Covid?

My friends, my family, making music, making a split album called While We Wait with my two friends and amazing musicians, Salóme Katrín and Sara Flindt, Cooking a lot of food, making a tiny and super exclusive home restaurant with my friends. The pandemic was weird but it was also OK.

Why should we come see you at Airwaves?

It’s going to be my first solo concert in a full band setting, and I’m so excited. I have my best friends and amazing musicians playing with me and I feel like we’re going to have a lot of fun, and I hope that the audience will feel that through the music and our chemistry.

Who else should we check out?

Oh boy, so many. Here’s a bunch: BSÍ, Inspector Spacetime, Gugusar, JóiPé, KUSK, Ultraflex, Supersport!, GRÓA, Axel Flóvent, CeaseTone, Una Torfa, Sucks To Be You Nigel, Árný Margrét, Ólafur Kram.

Where should we go during the day to nurse our Airwaves hangover?

I kind of want to keep it a secret because it’s a tiny place and I would love to have a seat there for myself, but I'll tell you (just don’t tell everyone ok?) It’s called The Coocoo’s Nest, and it’s the best place in town.

Skoffín

Named after the harmless mythical offspring of a cat and Arctic fox, this energetic post-punk outfit started as Jóhannes Bjarkason’s one-man outfit before expanding to a quartet. Now, with two albums to their name, Skoffín is set to bring their lively DIY energy to the masses.

Where in Iceland are you from?

We are all from the Greater Reykjavik area, each from our separate suburb.

When did you start making music?

We started making music in our teens, mainly as an escape to said suburban life.

Describe your sound

We sound like a good party, when all your friends are there.

What got you through Covid?

Frankly, it was our community of friends and fans. Covid was a strange time and definitely put a mental dent in us. Vaccinations also played a big part.

Why should we come see you at Airwaves?

Because we will make you happy and have a drink with you after the show. That’s the Skoffín guarantee.

Who else should we check out?

Honestly, you should try to see all of the local acts that have been coming out of Iceland these last few years. The standard of quality is amazing. From our end, you should check out local bands Supersport, Ólafur Kram, BSÍ, Sucks to be you Nigel, and Gróa. We also won’t be missing Crack Cloud or Porridge Radio this year.

Where should we go during the day to nurse our Airwaves hangover?

Start the day with lap at one of the pools. Then the sauna, then the ice bath and end your visit in the hot tub. Next, we love going for coffee and a donut at Deig, a stones throw from the docks.

Sucks to be you, Nigel!

This fast, crass and raw band is unafraid to break rules and conventions in their delivery of the Reykjavík grassroot punk sound. Joyful, irreverent and explosive live, their debut album Tína blóm (“Picking flowers”) is also a joy to listen to.

Where in Iceland are you from?

Reykjavík

When did you start making music?

We started making music in 2021.

Describe your sound

Post Hardrock, math chaos.

What got you through Covid?

We started making music together right in the middle of Covid so we had no comparison. Nevertheless, during Covid we had more time to practise and form a sound we liked.

Why should we come see you at Airwaves?

We'll be playing a lot of new songs and you’ll get a chance to see how we've evolved from our debut album.

Who else should we check out?

Trailer Todd(off venue), Gróa & BSÍ!!!

Where should we go during the day to nurse our Airwaves hangover?

Go to Prikið.

Supersport!

Dream punks Supersport! are the spiritual successors of bagdad brothers. They occupy a very liminal musical space between sounding very sweet and charming and wanting to talk about deep and serious topics. Whether it’s for the fun pop or intellectual stimulation (or both), be sure to check out Supersport!

Where in Iceland are you from?

It’s all the same shade of dark grey isolation and hopelessness 9 months of the year so does it really matter? Also don’t know if you know this but the capital region is split into like at least six municipalities and there’s no way to tell where one ends and another begins. Seems like an unnecessarily complicated system tbh? But yeah we’re from that general area I guess.

When did you start making music?

We’ve all been doing music things all our lives more or less. Bjarni, Þóra and Hugi all have a background in choir singing, which has actually been coming to light in some of our more recent compositions. But Supersport! assumed its form in the fall of 2019, so 3 years ago.

Describe your sound

Our sound is nothing special really, guitar music has been dead for such a long time tbh. But this band is a vehicle for our songs, which we think are quite good actually. That’s what it comes down to for us -- how can we deliver these songs in a striking and powerful way? The four-piece guitar-based band format has proven helpful here.

But if we have to describe the “sound” I guess u could say: 2 sexy choir geeks and another one with weird teeth picked up the guitar and paired their newfound love for pop music with the rhythmic impulses of a hot drummer friend with undiagnosed adhd? How’s that?

What got you through Covid?

Time I guess? Like it wasn’t easy at all. Idk if there was a specific thing that got us through it, we were here before and we’re still here now. Arthur Russell and Kate Bush’s music helped maybe! Our egos took a hit for sure, it’s a bit rough not to be applauded on stage every now and then once you’ve grown accustomed to it.

Why should we come see you at Airwaves?

Well we’ve been practicing a lot and people tell us we’re starting to sound tight like a proper band! If that’s not a reason to come out idk what is. But all joking aside though, there’s a bunch of people all over europe (and frankly all over the world) who envy you, dear iceland airwaves ticket holder, for your opportunity to catch our set this year. Don’t let them down!!

Who else should we check out?

We’re so blessed to be part of a local DIT (Do-It-Together) music & arts collective called post-dreifing, which honestly fosters all the most interesting acts in rvk at this point. If you’d been in iceland like six months earlier you might’ve been able to catch a show at our collectively organised DIT concert venue, Post-húsið, which has now been shut down by the city government due to neighbour complaints. Very cool! :))

Anyway, we recommend you check out our roster on bandcamp and try to catch all the artists you find there in the festival lineup. Some names for u: BSÍ, GRÓA, Ólafur Kram, Skoffín, Sucks To Be You, Nigel. And some other acts that aren’t directly involved in our collective but we also love: Ultraflex, Una Torfa, Sóley, sameheads, RAKEL, Magnús Jóhann, KUSK, Inspector Spacetime and more!! and more!!

Where should we go during the day to nurse our Airwaves hangover?

This question feels like a backwards way to ask for a pool recommendation haha. If that’s the case we recommend Sundhöll Reykjavíkur, but if you’re feeling like going a bit out of the city centre, you might as well go for Sundlaug Kópavogs. When it comes to hangover remedies, coffee helps also and if ur into that, Kaffibrennslan or Reykjavík Roasters (any location) are the places to go.

Systur

To locals the three sisters that form Systur were known as three quarters of Sísí Ey and later as Tripolia. As Systur, however, they took part in the 2022 Eurovision song contest on behalf of Iceland with their entry “Með hækkandi sól” (“With the rising sun”). After returning from Turin, Italy, they’ve continued playing together and touring around the country. Now they’ve got their sights set on the big Airwaves stage.

Where in Iceland are you from?

We are from Reykjavík, born and raised

When did you start making music?

We all started making music as kids and teenagers. We all made some songs as solo artist before we came together with Dj Oculus and formed the band Sísy Ey in 2011 and started co-writing music.

Describe your sound

It has an Americana folk sound with Indi vibes. We are genre fluid when it comes to music and love all kinds of sounds and music so what describes our sound today could be completely different next year.

What got you through Covid?

Writing music, listening to music, practicing gratitude, empathy, Netflix and all the other networks, FaceTime. We all hung out a lot of course and supported each other through these weird and unpredictable times. Then to no surprise we all ended up getting Covid at the same time 🤪

Why should we come see you at Airwaves?

Because we have a unique sound. We are three sisters and a brother. We harmonize and create a sound only siblings can create, we kind of become one. We process what live gives us and the emotion that follow with writing music and our songs are sincere and the lyrics are relatable to everyone.

Who else should we check out?

It’s hard to recommend artists because everyone is good and has something someone is looking for. We can definitely recommend Zöe, she is our good friend and a phenomenal singer and musician. We are so lucky to have her singing with us as well. Other than that we recommend you check out whatever speaks to you and draws you in.

Where should we go during the day to nurse our Airwaves hangover

Definitely go to the pool and hang out in the hot tubs and then go to the cold tub. After that you should be ready for continuing your drinking and musical experience.

Ultraflex

Supergroup Ultraflex is one half Kari Jahnsen of Farao fame, and Katrín Helga Andrésdóttir who is known as Special-K and from Daughters of Reykjavík. As Ultraflex this Nordic duo embraces an idealised version of an 80s glitzy aesthetic and dreamy disco soundscape. If you have any intention to dance at Airwaves, Ultraflex is not to be missed.

Where in Iceland are you from?

Katrín is from Reykjavík, Kari is from Norway.

When did you start making music?

We’ve both been making music for as long as we can remember, but we started this project in 2019 when we were asked to write a commissioned piece together for the festivals Insomnia Tromso and Extreme Chill. We had a good time, so we decided to be a band.

Describe your sound

Like a mash-up of Alice Deejay, Enrique Inglesias and International Music System.

What got you through Covid?

Having each other to laugh with in the studio.

Why should we come see you at Airwaves?

Because we’ll be playing with a supergroup live band for the first time. Tumi Árnason, Magnús Trygvason Eliassen and Bjarni Daníel Þorvaldsson will be up there with us. It's gonna be hot and steamy and we’re gonna do some exercising.

Who else should we check out?

Neonme, Russian Girls, Sóley, Supersport, Daughters of Reykjavík, BSÍ, Gróa, Gugusar, Rakel, Inspector Spacetime, JFDR, Flott, Arlo Parks.

Where should we go during the day to nurse our Airwaves hangover?

To the pool with us!

Una Torfa

Una’s music comes from a place removed from her few earthly years. She bares her soul and embraces vulnerability in songs exploring the life and struggles of a young and queer woman in her 20s. Check out her EP Flækt og týnd og einmanna (“Complicated and lost and lonely”), out now.

Where in Iceland are you from?

I was born and raised in Reykjavík.

When did you start making music?

I’ve been singing since I can remember and I started writing songs with my friends and by myself at around 10 years old, nothing serious really, just a bit of fun. I started writing in Icelandic at 15 and have really never turned back.

Describe your sound

I would say that my sound feels intimate and familiar, I like to give myself to the listener as fully as I can. I play the acoustic guitar and the melodies I write are rooted in folk music but they definitely have a strong pop connection as well. I put a lot of emphasis on my lyrics and look at each performance as a bit of storytelling, so hopefully the audience understands the meaning and feel of the songs without having to understand the language.

What got you through Covid?

Spending time with my closest friends and family. I also tried making croissants from scratch, that occupied a good chunk of time.

Why should we come see you at Airwaves?

Because I’ll be playing with a band for the first time and we are so excited to give you a great show! I would love to share this hour of my life with a room full of music lovers and friends and I promise I’ll do my best to help you make some memories.

Who else should we check out?

Oh my, there are so many great acts this year but I would absolutely recommend JóiPé for some raw, beautiful rap and powerful hooks, Rakel for the most delicate, wonderful voice you’ll hear all weekend, and CeaseTone for intricate compositions mixing progressive rock with indie melodies. (Also, all of these people are my friends and they are super great and I’ll be seeing their shows and you should too.)

Where should we go during the day to nurse our Airwaves hangover?

Get the Buffalo wings at Le Kock or a donut at Deig (in the same location) and go swimming. If you want to explore, go see Hallgrímskirkja (the church) and Harpa (the concert hall) and definitely check out one of the museums in downtown Reykjavík.

Find out more about Icleand Airwaves at airwaves.is

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