Back in 2019, Massive Attack announced that they were partnering with analysts from Manchester University’s Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research to provide data accumulated from their touring and recording schedule to contribute to a larger investigation into the carbon footprint of the music industry.

Today (6 September) they've published the findings from the research as a roadmap titled Roadmap To Super Low Carbon Live Music, which highlights key points such as eliminating the use of private jets, encouraging audiences to use public transport such as trains, recommending venues to switch to green energy sources, and for festivals and other outdoor events to "phase out the use of diesel generators by 2025".

Robert del Naja, aka 3D said, "We’re grateful to Tyndall Centre analysts for providing our industry with a comprehensive, independent, scientifically produced formula to facilitate industry compatibility with the Paris/1.5 degrees climate targets – but what matters now is implementation. The major promotors simply must do more - it can’t be left to artists to continually make these public appeals."

"But our sector is operating in a government void," he continued. "Nine weeks out of COP26, where is the industrial plan, or any plan at all, for the scale of transformation that’s required for the UK economy and society?"

He added, "Fossil fuel companies seem to have no problem at all getting huge subsidies from government, but where is the plan for investment in clean battery technology, clean infrastructure or decarbonized food supply for a live music sector that generates £4.6 billion for the economy every year & employs more than 200k dedicated people? It simply doesn’t exist."

Massive Attack's full Roadmap To Super Low Carbon Live Music report is available to read now.