A new emotional depth for the band, with its originating from the surrealism image denoting the peaks and troughs of life, it’s not surprising the album carries a somewhat bittersweet tone. Lead single "Back To The Radio" moves like a poem: “We sit here together, laughing and talking / but I want to cry to you.” Lyrics of a similar nature can be heard throughout, often pairing mundane everyday situations with the deeper emotional turmoil felt inside: “I got a splinter / the last time I visited you / but my body pushed it out.”

Lead singer Dana Margolin’s vocals dutifully carry emotion, often showing complete versatility. Whilst the overall sound of the band does feel more polished compared to earlier material, Margolin’s raw and rough vocals add an edge to the overall sound – her voice somewhat akin to a PJ Harvey or Patti Smith. The anguish and raucousness in “The Rip” is a stark comparison to the tenderness on “Flowers”, a slower, piano leading ballad with the lyrics painting a vividly raw image: “You cut tomatoes, they’re soft to the touch / When will you punish me for what I have done?” Margolin asks desperately. Then, a softer, more defeated moment: “On monday she cleared all the gunk from my heart / shoveled it out to make room for the light.” It’s a definite standout track of the album.

Waterslide, Diving Board, Ladder To The Sky is a brilliantly crafted album. Stylistically, all 12 tracks feel brilliantly stitched together, and the album as a whole is a complete standout for Porridge Radio as a band.