Fresh from inking a deal with Heavenly Recordings, Leeds-based soloist Eaves this week unveiled the spellbinding "As Old As The Grave". It sounds like Mr Eaves has perused some old tomes on the great art of songwriting, the track driven at the start by gorgeous, unaccompanied folk harmonies that wouldn't sound out of place on a Fleet - wood or Foxes - record. Born of interlocking, cascading acoustics, "As Old As The Grave" centres itself on bright, root humming melodies, if only to be darkened by its lyrical focus on alcoholism. Exceptionally promising stuff.

Philippines producer Eyedress teamed up with Londoner Georgia for cut-up electro in the shape of "When I'm Gone". A song that completely disperses itself just seconds in, "When I'm Gone" is a fascinating example of how not to constrain oneself musically. Melting samples, GEoRGiA's distant vocals, hop-skipping rhythms, and dissonance and consonance in constant flux, it's only the gurgling synthline that remains stoic. Wildy inventive writing and another example of the mastermind of Eyedress.

Certainly at the more directly-accessible end of the scale was "Why" by Les Sins (Chaz Bundick of Toro Y Moi fame). It was cruel to drop this disco-belter on Wednesday when the weekend still felt lightyears away, dressed as it is in delectable wah-wah and featured singer Nate Salman's polished vocal. Les Sins' debut record, Michael, is released on 3 November via Company.

Sweden's Korallreven returned this week with the hyper emotional pop of "Spirit Away". It's the first we've heard from the duo since their 2011 self-titled debut, a certain Best Fit fave. Featuring supple vocals from the pair's Marcus Joons and breathy heights from fellow Swede China, "Spirit Away" is a band re-energised with its Euro synths and heavily propulsive beats.

Last up, prolific producer Dev Hynes (Blood Orange) enlisted upcoming RnB talent Tinashe to sing on his next experimental cut, "Bet". The track is riddled in the main with dirty trap and ghoulish samples, buoyed by Tinashe's velveteen vocal, before being sucked into the vacuous space of a typically dramatic Hynes guitar solo. It's pretty complicated work from Hynes and we dig it.

Listen to our selection of the week's best new music below: