Empress Of

Me

Me is both a fabulous anthology of boisterous pop songs, and a timely, revelatory album for a lot of people to live vicariously through. It’s not exactly a Catcher In The Rye or Less Than Zero type coming of age story, but Rodriguez has the potential to spark enlightenment of reality with her sentiments of self-realisation and emotional honesty.

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Ezra Furman

Perpetual Motion People

Perpetual Motion People lives up to its title. Furman never sounds like he's fronting the same band on any two tracks, and the copious, fascinating sleevenotes which accompany the record give every song its own address. In the essay, Furman talks candidly of pivotal moments in his life which he drew on for the making of the record: suicidal thoughts in his early twenties, his rising popularity, coming out as non-gender-binary.

Ultimately, he comes to the realisation that "I would never fully join this society; I would always be somehow outside of it...If nothing else, it's an interesting way to live."

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Father John Misty

I Love You Honeybear

I Love You, Honeybear is love not as a transformative experience or something that enables the person or persons in love to undergo a metamorphosis; it’s warts-and-all love, an admission that being in love might make you happier that you’re with someone who loves you back (and, importantly, understands and accepts your flaws) but it doesn’t change your worldview, your pessimistic nature, your self-destructive traits – just as you are unable to change your partner’s particular characteristics by falling in love.

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Floating Points

Elaenia

Floating Points has always stood out by making electronic music able to bridge a gap between dancefloors and bedrooms without alienating either camp and Elaenia is as impressive and rewarding as you want to be. If you’re looking for some music to jog to, this probably isn’t it. But for an album to lose 40 minutes in – to remember what it feels like for an LP to challenge the listener to stay enveloped for its whole duration – look no further.

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Foals

What Went Down

What Went Down is a consolidation and refinement of Foals’ artistic strengths and explorations over their previous trio of albums. Yet, after dashing and long-stepping their way from squawking math-rock curios to, at once, hulking but limber rock titans, Foals has reached a precipice. It’s not difficult to see certain harm peering over the edge, though the veneered beauty of the scenery below may prove too enchanting to pass up.

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